BUZZ    Teacher’s Notes Volume 5/Number15 (June 2012)

 

Cover: Buzz

 

Application:

 

A puzzle to find which item there is only one of.

 

A sorting puzzle

 

39 objects are floating over Buzz’s head, only one hasn’t got a matching pair. Which is it?

 

 

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Buzz15cover.png

 

Pupils look at detail to find difference in shape and colour to sort and eliminate.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Looking for pairs and recognise differences.

Problem solving: making observations, finding a strategy and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

 

Encourage children to describe the different items and find a strategy.

Ask, how they are to go about eliminating pairs: what is the best strategy? Does it help to start at the top?

 

Ask the children if they can make an estimate of how many items are in the picture (39), and then how many pairs (19). Discuss the difficulty in estimating numbers over four or five (people of ancient times only counted one, two and many).

 

The larger items are usually the easiest to spot. For a child who is finding it too difficult, suggest counting the shells (there are 5) but allow him or her to discover it is the cockle that doesn’t have its pair.

 

matches/ same/ difference

pair

 

sort

 

left, right

top, bottom

 

over/above

under/below

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in solving problems involving shape and number. Being able to describe features. Vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­2 and 3: Introductory puzzle: Who won the race? and Contents 

 

 

Application:

 

The theme of Issue 8 is counting and calculating.

 

The introduction puzzle shows the Buzz kids telling us how long he or she took to run the race.

 

A table at the bottom allows the children to write in the names of the Buzz Kids and the times and put them in order.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

Buzz15intocontents2.png

 

 

 

Collect information and annotate results.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Calculating with time.

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data, annotate in a table.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This is a useful exercise, consolidating that there are 60 seconds in a minute, and putting numbers that are close together in order.

 

Ask, which pair of operations has the smallest number (Luke and Lucy), and which the largest (Becky and Sasha). Talk about the positions, difference between fastest and slowest (20 seconds), how long a minute is.

Count

Difference

Number

Data

Sort

First

Second

Third

Fourth

Fifth

Sixth

Seventh

Eighth

Order

Faster

Slower

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in putting 2 digit numbers in order, and then being able to answer questions about the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 4 and 5:  Rock pool numbers

 

Application:

 

The reader is asked to count and do simple multiplication to answer questions in a table. Buzz and Fizz are hiding in the scene.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Buzz15rockPools3.png

 

Counting and sorting to answer questions requiring addition and multiplication.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition and multiplication operations.

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Younger readers may need help in doing the multiplications: remind them it is repeated addition, and check they have spotted all the items (the fifth crab on Becky’s foot is easy to miss). Point out that the crabs have eight legs (the pinchers are not legs) and the starfish five arms.

 

The flags are taken to show four triangles though you could ask an older child if he or she could also spot the four overlapping right-angled triangles on each flag as well (this would show an understanding of a higher level and not expected of the BUZZ age range).

 

The secret word will help them know if they have the answers needed for this exercise, or if they have missed a crab!

 

More questions could be asked: how many children’s legs are there? How many eyes, including the fish and crabs?

 

Sorting and calculating in this way also leads on to understanding multiplication.

 

 

 

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

Multiply

multiplication

Times

Difference

Same as

Data

Sort

Set

Total

Addition

 

 

Assessment strategy

Recognising repeated addition is using multiplication.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 6 and 7: Shell Collections

 

 

Application:

The reader is invited to draw in the remaining shells, using the information in the speech bubbles.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

Buzz15shellcollection.png

 

 

Read word sentences and make decisions.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting and understanding number.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is accessible to Year 2 children and beyond, but even some children in Year 3 may need help in working through the information given by each Buzz kid. Younger children may need help, which could be using props and talking though each statement. Discuss with children what ‘half’ and ‘twice as’ means, for example.

 

 

Further questions could be, who has the most shells, or the fewest? How many limpets have been found altogether?

 

Subtraction, difference

Take away, leave

How many

Numbers

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

Most

Fewer

Equal

Half

Twice

Altogether

 

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to solve word problems in practical contexts, and use the information to answer questions shows good reasoning. Children achieving in this understanding in Years 1 and 2 would be working at a high level.

 

 

 

Pages 8 and 9: Paths to seven

 

 

Application:

 

Puffin has to find routes down the cliff, adding up to the number 7.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Buzz15pathsto7.png

 

Doing subtractions and additions to solve a maze.

 

 

Resources required: pencil and paper

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition.

 

Problem solving: making decisions, using a strategy and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This is a maze with a difference as there are eleven ways to go down the cliffs, obeying the criteria of only counting up to seven. It has the appearance of being ‘easy’ but in fact demands some perseverance to find all the possibilities.

 

Suggest children write down their routes. They will see how pairs of numbers (for example, 2 and 2, 4 and 1) can be used to find more routes. At first glance, many children may be satisfied with finding three routes (when tested on some Year 3 children only one found as many as six routes), so encourage children to look for other numbers that make seven: ask, How many ways can you pass the 4? (3). Which is the longest? Which is the shortest way? (Could they measure with marking lengths along a piece of paper?) Which ways use the most numbers? How many pairs of numbers are there that sum to seven? (3).

How many

Numbers

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

Longest

Shortest

Fewest

Most

Length

Measure

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

To be able to use strategies to do simple addition. By asking children to explain directions their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­10 and 11: Divide or double

 

 

Application:

 

A ‘colouring in’ picture with rules to follow.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

Buzz15divideorDouble.png

 

Using multiplication and division to solve the task.

 

 

Resources required: coloured pencils or felt pens (yellow, orange and light brown)

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing multiplication and division operations, using the 2 times table.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Colouring in using a set of rules is good practise for using a table, and this colouring picture requires being careful with the orientation of different triangles. They are also asked to do multiplications from the 2 times tables and divisions involving halving. This is not expected of children in Year 1 (who can be helped with the numbers), but Year 2 children will begin to know the symbols x 2, and will have begun to recognise that multiplication is the inverse of division. If they know one fact they know the other, doubling reverses halving. Year 3 children and beyond should be more comfortable with knowing these simple number facts, but this is a good way to illustrate how checking with an inverse operation (knowing 9 multiplied by 2 is the same as 18 divided by 2) is useful.

 

Care needs to be taken in colouring the right triangles for each square. Talk about the rotation of the triangles, and their orientation (describing top left or bottom right corner for example).

 

Shape

Triangle

Rotate

Right angled

Square

Top, bottom,

Left, right

Corner

How many

Multiply

Product

Double

Divide/halve

Add, addition, more, plus

Numbers

Sum, make, total

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence multiplying and dividing by two. Recognising rotation of shapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­12 and 13: Three sets of dots

 

 

Application:

 

A dot-to-dot puzzle using rules.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Buzz15dots.png

 

Doing simple addition and follow rules.

 

 

Resources required: colouring pens or pencils

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition operations.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The first section of this puzzle requires adding in fives, which will reveal the wave of the shoreline. It could be pointed out to Year 3 children that this is the five times table, and ask what they notice about the ending of each number (a 0 or a 5). It also demonstrates multiplication is repeated addition with the use of a number line. Joining the dots, adding on 1 each time, discovers the crab. The starfish is found by adding on 2 each time.

 

Younger children may need to be helped, as they will be used to simply joining dots in order, and there are three different ‘0’ starting points. The dots are differently coloured to help alert them to this.

 

How many

Multiply

Product

Double

Divide/halve

Add, addition, more, plus

Numbers

Sum, make, total

 

 

Assessment strategy

Knowing simple number facts, using multiplication.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­14 and 15: Beach time

 

 

Application:

 

A story where Buzz dawdles on his way to meet Fizz.

 

Questions about calculating in time are on the next page.

 

Brief answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and go back to puzzles to look at them again if they missed something.

 

Full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Buzz15Pages15.png

 

Pupils are presented with a story about time.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

 

Solving problems involving time.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The story shows Buzz and Fizz at the seaside with a clock giving the time of 11.00 at the start of the story.

 

It offers a good opportunity to talk about time

in a story/real life context. Reading the story with a child, ask how much time has passed by the time Buzz has reached the deckchairs. Children as young as Year 1 may well know that the big hand has moved by half an hour on the analogue clock, and most Year 2’s will know this is 30 minutes. To confirm this, ask, how many minutes in an hour? How many minutes in half an hour?

 

Extra time

The puzzle on the next page asks how much longer Buzz took to get to the deck chairs than the 7 minutes it would have taken without the stops. Ask, Can you suggest the time spent at each stop Buzz takes as he makes his way to the deckchairs? Estimating time in seconds and minutes helps children understand and use time as a measure.

 

 

 

How long

Soon

Faster

Slower

Seconds

Minutes

60 minutes

30minute

Time taken

Clock face

Big hand

Small hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in making sense of problems relating to time, with a practical context.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 16: Curious harbour

 

 

Application:

 

A picture puzzle that involves observation and reasoning. There are at least 22 different oddities to find.

 

The secret puzzle of spotting a starfish carries through each spread of the magazine, including this one.

 

(The answers on page 15 of the magazine gives 10 things and the full list can be found in online Answers)

 

Buzz15curiousHarbour.png

 

Can be used as an introduction to keeping tallies.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting, keeping a tally, describing position.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Some of the curious things will be easy to spot, so all children should engage easily with this puzzle. Most will spot the odd objects on the boats (a lolly, a candle and an anchor on the mast) and a pig floating in the water.

 

Some may not be so easy to recognise. Encourage children to use language to describe why something is odd: what is wrong with the flags (two are blowing in the opposite direction to the one on the boat and the sails behind). The clock face has its numbers upside down and the time of the next boat trip is not possible as it is more than 24.00. An element of reasoning is required.

 

Suggest keeping a tally as each oddity is found, to keep a count of their discoveries. Cooperation in sharing knowledge comes from comparing with each other to see which ones may have been missed.

 

 

Matches/ same/ different

Direction

Left, right

Top, bottom

Position

Over/above

Under/below

Beside

Next

Upside down

Tally

Count

Number

How many

Digital

Analogue

 

Assessment strategy

By asking children to describe the location of the strange things they find their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words. Understanding how to make a record of the number they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity sheet 10 (available online: see BUZZ Activity Sheets)

 

 

Application:

 

An investigation is presented by Buzz and Fizz, making number sentences with corresponding facts.

 

PDF’s of the worksheet is available online

by clicking on the BUZZ button on the CIRCA Home page, go to Activity Sheets, and click on the relevant picture:

http://www.circamaths.co.uk/buzzws15.html

BuzzWorksheet15.png­­­­

 

 

­­

calculations: addition and subtraction

 

Resources required: pencil

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Find mental calculation strategies:

Use patterns of similar calculations

Use the relationship between addition and subtraction

Problem solving: deciding on a method or tools to complete the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

If children have tackled the worksheet ‘Sum Fridge’ (BUZZ issue 7 Activity sheets 7a and 7b) they will have been asked for number sentences that use the numbers 0 to 10. This worksheet is different in that it focuses on the usefulness of realising that once you have knowledge of one number sentence, there are three different number sentences that are implied with the facts of the first. Whereas able Year 2 children can tackle this activity, it is aimed more at Years 3 and 4, as it uses 2 digit numbers and therefore slightly more challenging sums. Some boxes have been filled in to prompt children to see the connection and corresponding facts. The third allows children to make their own number sentence and related sentences. It will not matter if they choose easier numbers, as the main purpose is to understand the relationship between addition and subtraction.

 

If using in a class or group, encourage the children to say the sentences out loud. How many subtractions and additions for each one?

 

The exercise of recording their number sentences is useful:  learning how to organise one’s work will encourage a systematic approach to doing similar calculations, and lead to mathematical understanding.

 

Extension:

For older children: can you work out one fact mentally, such as 60 + 25, and then state three other related facts?

Add

Subtract

Total

Patterns

Number sentence

Different

Equals

Minus

Plus

Pairs

Sum

Target number

Less

More

Same

Implies

relationship

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

A confidence in recognising patterns, using the relationship between addition and subtraction. Discover mental calculation strategies.