BUZZ    TeacherŐs Notes Volume 4/Number10 (Nov 2010)

 

Cover: Buzz

 

Application:

 

A puzzle to find which set of fish has the largest number.

 

A sorting puzzle

 

Many fish are swimming under Nessie. It is necessary to sort them into six sets and count how many are in each set: which has the largest number?

 

 

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

cover1

 

Pupils look at detail to find difference in shape and colour to sort and count.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting and understanding number. Estimate and then check by counting.

Recognise differences.

Problem solving: making observations and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

 

The differences between the six sets of fish are by shape, number of fins, size as well as colours. Encourage children to describe the different features.

 

Ask the children if they can make an estimate of how many fish are in the picture (30), and then how many are in each set. Discuss the difficulty in estimating numbers over four or five (people of ancient times only counted one, two and many).

 

Ask, how they are to go about counting the six sets: what is the best strategy? How many can be recognised at a glance before they lose count? Does it help to count in twos or threes? Which set has the fewest number of fish?

 

There are 6 green spotty fish, 5 yellow fish, 5 blue striped fish, 5 green striped fish, 5 orange fish, 4 blue and white fish.

matches/ same/ difference

stripes, wavy lines

wider, thinner, longer

 

sort, group, type, set

 

many

most (size of group)

largest (in number)

fewest, (in number)

least (size of group)

 

left, right

top, bottom

 

over/above

under/below

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in solving problems involving shape and number. Being able to describe features. Vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­2 and 3: Introductory puzzle: Adding and subtraction match and Contents 

 

 

Application:

 

The theme of Issue 8 is addition and subtraction.

 

The introduction puzzle shows the Buzz kids holding up additions and subtractions.

 

A panel at the bottom allows the children to write in the names of the Buzz Kids and the answers, in pairs to show which ones share the same answer.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

Buzz10intoP2

 

 

 

Pupils do the operations, collect information and annotate their results.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Do addition and subtractions.

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data, annotate in a table.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Children may start by doing the first operation, then look to find a subtraction that has a difference of 10. This is a good opportunity to use the correct vocabulary, aiding understanding that answers to subtractions are the difference between two numbers, and the answer to addition is the sum. Doing the operations mentally is good practice, but younger children may find it helpful to work on paper, and find the matches afterwards.

 

Ask, which pair of operations has the smallest number (Luke and Lucy), and which the largest (Becky and Sasha).

Count

Addition,

Sum,

Subtraction,

Difference

Take away

Number

Data

Sort

many

most (size of group)

largest (in number)

fewest, (in number)

least (size of group)

 

match

pair

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence doing additions and subtractions accurately, and then being able to answer questions about the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 4 and 5:  Highland fling

 

Application:

 

The reader is asked to sort sets from the dancers and musicians, and answer questions about them. Buzz and Fizz are hiding in the scene.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Buzz10pp45.png

 

Counting and sorting to answer questions requiring addition and subtraction.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition and subtraction operations.

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Younger readers may need help in sorting the different sets, and find it helpful to annotate the numbers they need to add or subtract. The secret word will help them know if they have the correct answers. More questions could be asked about the fling, such as, if all the dancers and drummers wanted a glass of water, how many glasses would be needed? How many are in the picture, including the Buzz Kids and cats?

 

Sorting and organising data in this simple way also leads on to more challenging data handling.

 

 

 

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

Subtract, take away, minus

Leave

Difference

Same as

Data

Sort

Set

Total

Addition

Subtraction

Leave

Difference

 

Add

Sum

Smallest

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to solve word problems in practical contexts, and use the information to answer questions shows good reasoning. Children achieving in this understanding in Years 1 and 2 would be working at a high level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 6 and 7: Take away biscuits

 

 

Application:

The reader is invited to draw in the remaining biscuits on each plate by working out the subtraction from 10.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

Buzz10pp67.png

 

 

Find differences from ten with simple subtractions.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting and understanding number.

Recognise pairs of numbers that make ten.

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is accessible to Year 2 children and beyond, who will enjoy the process of drawing in the missing biscuits. Younger children may need help, which could be using props and talking though each statement.

 

Further questions could be, who has the most biscuits left, or the least?

 

Remind children of pairs of numbers that make ten. Ask them to explain in their own words the operation they are doing.

 

 

Subtraction, difference

Take away, leave

How many

Numbers

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

less than

least

most

most

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in finding strategies to solve number problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 8 and 9: Find the nines

 

 

Application:

 

Two Buzz kids have a maze to solve by doing additions and subtractions. Only the stones which make the answer nine are safe to step on.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Buzz10pp89.png

 

Doing subtractions and additions to solve a maze.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition and subtraction operations.

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Nine often trips up children when doing operations, but it may help to remind them that nine is just one less than ten, and the additions are not difficult to spot.

 

Recognising the stones that make nine will encourage children to see number patterns: ask them to describe them in their own words. For example, with 2 digit subtractions that have a difference of nine, the number being taken away is one more than the second digit of the first number.

 

For younger children, suggest they find and mark all the blocks  (ones that do not make nine) before attempting the maze.

Subtraction, difference

Take away, leave

How many

Numbers

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

less than

least

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

To be able to use strategies to do simple addition and subtraction. By asking children to explain directions their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­10 and 11: Dotty adding and subtraction

 

 

Application:

 

A dot-to-dot puzzle using rules.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

Buzz10pp910.png

Using addition and subtraction to solve the task.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition and subtraction operations.

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The first section of this puzzle requires adding in twos, which will reveal the bagpipes Buzz is playing. It could be pointed out that this is also moving up in odd numbers as it starts with one.

 

Once the number 85 is reached, the rule changes to take away 5. Younger children may need to be helped with this, as they will be used to simply joining dots in order. Use a number line to introduce the idea.

 

 

Subtraction, difference

Take away, leave

How many

Numbers

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

less than

least

odd, even

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in adding in twos and subtraction with fives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­12 and 13: Sum Picture

 

 

Application:

 

A Ôcolouring inŐ picture with rules to follow.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

Buzz10Tpp12.png

 

 

Recognise shapes and follow rules.

 

 

Resources required: colouring pens or pencils (grey and blue)

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Doing addition operations.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Colouring in using a set of rules is good practise for using a table, and this colouring picture requires being careful with the orientation of different triangles, and doing simple addition with numbers under ten.

 

Ask, how will you spot numbers that sum to nine? If they have done the stepping-stone maze, this will be easier.

 

Care needs to be taken in colouring the right triangles

for each square.

 

shape

triangle

right angled

square

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in recognising transformations of triangles and doing additions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­14 and 15: Biscuit

 

 

Application:

 

A story where Buzz offers biscuits on his way to meet Fizz.

 

Questions about missing biscuits from an array are on the next page.

 

Brief answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and go back to puzzles to look at them again if they missed something.

 

Full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Buzz10pp1415.png

 

Pupils are presented with a problem about quantities in a story context.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

 

Solving problems with counting and subtracting.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The story shows Buzz begin with ten biscuits, and offer them out as he goes to visit Fizz.

 

It offers a good opportunity to calculate with numbers

in a story/real life context. Reading the story with a child, ask if he or she can keep count of the biscuits as Buzz goes.

 

More missing biscuits

The puzzle on the next page looks at arrays of biscuits in packets, and asks how many are missing from the complete packs. This involves looking at shape as well as number, and children may find it helpful to draw in the shapes. The second two are more challenging.

 

 

Subtraction, difference

Take away, leave

How many

Add, addition, more, plus

Sum, make, total

less than

least /left

triangle

circle

segment

square

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in making sense of problems relating to counting, with a practical context. Understanding and ability to talk about shape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 16: Curious Supper

 

 

Application:

 

A picture puzzle that involves observation and reasoning. There are at least 22 different oddities to find.

 

The secret puzzle of spotting Nessie carries through each spread of the magazine, including this one.

 

(The answers on page 15 of the magazine gives 10 things and the full list can be found in online Answers)

 

Buzz10pp16.png

 

Can be used as an introduction to keeping tallies.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting, keeping a tally, describing position.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Some of the curious things will be easy to spot, so all children should engage easily with this puzzle. Most will spot the boot and train under the table.

 

Some may not be so easy to recognise. Encourage children to use language to describe why something is odd: what is wrong with the shadows (the ice cream parasol is on the wrong side). There is a light bulb on the candle-stick and a missing leg on the stool. An element of reasoning is required.

 

Suggest keeping a tally as each oddity is found, to keep a count of their discoveries. Cooperation in sharing knowledge comes from comparing with each other to see which ones may have been missed.

 

 

matches/ same/ different

direction

left, right

top, bottom

position

over/above

under/below

beside

next

upside down

tally

count

number

how many

 

Assessment strategy

By asking children to describe the location of the strange things they find their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words. Understanding how to make a record of the number they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity sheet 10 (available online: see BUZZ Activity Sheets)

 

 

Application:

 

An investigation is presented by Buzz and Fizz, making number sentences with fridge magnets.

 

PDFŐs of the worksheet is available online

by clicking on the BUZZ button on the CIRCA Home page,go to Activity Sheets, and click on the relevant picture:

http://www.circamaths.co.uk/buzzws10.html

buzz10act1.png­­­­

 

 

­­

calculations: addition and subtraction

 

Resources required: pencil

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Find mental calculation strategies:

Use patterns of similar calculations

Use the relationship between addition and subtraction

Problem solving: deciding on a method or tools to complete the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This worksheet is designed to be accessible to several Year groups.

The worksheet asks for number sentences that give the answer, 3 (two are given), using the numbers 0 to 10; a task suitable for Year 2 and up. If using in a class or group, encourage the children to say the sentences out loud. Going on to try other numbers is the next part of this activity. Using mental calculation strategies, they might see a pattern of addition and subtractions

and may even be able to predict what will happen with the next number.

Although it is good to know the doubling of numbers (as in 2 + 2), they do not belong in this investigation, so remind children they can only use a number (from the choice of 0 to 10) once in a number sentence.

 

As with the worksheet from BUZZ 7, this offers scope for some real investigation: Ask, how will they use what they have learnt from looking for threes, fours and fives? How many subtractions and additions for each one?

Encourage them to use their own words, for example: the number of subtractions for the target number 2 is 8, and is one less for the target number 3.

Ask, what do you think will happen with a target of 4?

 

The exercise of recording their number sentences is useful:  learning how to organise oneŐs work will encourage a systematic approach to investigating patterns of similar calculations, and lead to mathematical understanding.

 

Extension:

For older children: what happens to target numbers using numbers 0 to 20?

Add

Subtract

Total

Patterns

Number sentence

Different

Equals

Minus

Plus

Pairs

Sum

Target number

Less

More

Same

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

A confidence in recognising patterns, using the relationship between addition and subtraction. Discover mental calculation strategies.