BUZZ    Teacher’s Notes Volume 4/Number 11 (March 2011)

 

Cover: Buzz

 

Application:

 

A visual puzzle requiring matching the correct sections to the larger picture.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Pupils recognise differences in shape and use a strategy to do the task.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The challenge here is to look in detail at the small sections, which vary in subtlety: the bottom right piece with the flowerpots look correct, but this square section would have the elbow of Buzz showing at the right edge. Good observation is required, and most children will be able to do this without help, given a little time.

Ask, how would you describe the pieces, explain what is missing.

 

Matches/ Same/ Difference

Left, right

Top, bottom

Over/above

Under/below

Next to

Beside

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in solving problems involving shape. Being able to describe features. Vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­2 and 3: Introductory puzzle: Water cress and Contents 

 

 

Application:

 

The theme of Issue 11 is mathematical pictures: handling data and measure.

 

The introduction puzzle shows the Buzz kids growing watercress in yoghurt pots. The task is to work out when each pot is ready.

 

A table at the bottom allows the children to write in the results from collecting the data.

 

There is a hidden caterpillar on every spread. Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Pupils collect information, calculate and annotate their results.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data. Extract and interpret from a table.

Make calculations with time.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Each Buzz Kid makes a statement of when his or her pot was planted. Children in Years 1 and 2 may find the activity quite challenging, as it requires adding on eight days to a given date and putting the pots in order. Use a number line or calendar to help.

 

This demonstrates the usefulness of using a table to show the results. 

 

The question at the end involves extracting and understanding the table they have filled in, showing that the day no pot is ready is the 17th.

 

 

Sum

Addition

Number

Data

Sort

List

Time

Days of the

Month

Date

 

First/ last

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in collecting data accurately, make calculations and then being able to answer questions about the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 4 and 5:  Garden Hunt

 

Application:

 

The reader is asked to make a tally and do some addition. Buzz and Fizz are hiding in the picture, as well as the little caterpillar.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Organising data into tables.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Children are set the task of finding a number of things in the large picture, colouring in the tally and writing in the numbers. Children will enjoy looking for the items they have to count in the picture, including spotting where Fizz and Buzz are hiding.

 

Sorting and organising data in this simple way leads on to more challenging data handling. The total is asked for (45 things) and other questions could be asked: which is the smallest number of things? Which is the most? Put the objects in order, fewest to most. Show as a bar graph.

 

Data

Sort

Set

List

Label

Table

Title

Tally

Fewest

Most

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to solve word problems in practical contexts, and use the information to complete tables shows good reasoning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 6 and 7: Sunflowers

 

Application:

 

The height of sunflowers is shown against the fence.

Children use the lines on the fence to measure and complete the table.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Measuring and completing a bar graph.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Estimate measure.

Collecting data. Extract and interpret from a table.

Compare and order measures in cm, using a scale.

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is accessible to Year 2 children and beyond. The children may need guidance in using the lines on the fence as a way to measure: ask, what is the height of the fence? Agree that the top of the fence is 100 cm, or 1 metre, as you start at 0 on the ground. An estimate must be made to decide how tall Kwok’s sunflower is. Sasha’s is given as 90cm, and this confirms the scale on the fence.

 

The activity asks to give the height of the shortest sunflower (40cm). Other questions could also be asked. How much taller is Yasmin’s sunflower than Luke’s? Sasha’s compared to Lucy’s. Which two sunflowers have the middle height? (the median could be found by taking the middle of these two heights).

How tall

Tallest

Shortest

Average

Short

Height

Centimetre

cm

Metre

 

Represents

More than

Less than

Compare

Bar graph

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in measuring using a scale, sorting information using tables and diagrams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 8 and 9: Flowerpot maze

 

 

Application:

 

Two of the Buzz kids thread their way through a maze, collecting different coloured flowerpots that are in their way.

 

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Solving a maze using strategy and sorting information to make a diagram.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data quickly and complete a table. Extract and interpret from a table, Identifying further questions.

Problem solving, reasoning and numeracy: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Keeping a tally as each coloured flowerpot is met will prove to be an essential part of the activity. Suggest they find the route first, than start again making the tally.

Having completed the maze, they are asked to complete the table diagram, by putting in the number of each colour they find. The final question encourages using useful vocabulary regarding quantities (most, least, fewest, most of).

 

Ask, why is a table a useful way to show how many things there are? Talk about the visual aspect of diagrams. What other way could they show the data? (Pictograms, bar line chart, bar charts). Ask, when would a pictogram be a good way to show the data (e.g. when one pictogram can represent several units.)

Other questions could be asked: How many red flowerpots are there altogether in the hedge maze? How many are not picked up by the Buzz kids? and so on.

Data

How many

Number list

Represents

More than

Less than

Fewest

Most of

Least

 

Bar chart

Table

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

To be able to sort, list and use diagrams confidently. By asking children to explain directions their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­10 and 11:Tulips

 

 

Application:

 

A challenging activity that requires the reader to recognise pattern and use logic. Finding the correct order will show a word on the bottom shelf.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Solving a problem by recognising a pattern or sequence.

 

 

Resources required: colouring pencils: purple, yellow and blue

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Develop mathematical ideas and methods to solve problems.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The puzzle requires understanding that the arrangement of colours on each shelf always follows the same sequence, but the start of the sequence varies each time.

As this is quite a difficult concept, several of the tulips have been coloured in on the bottom shelf, but it still requires realising that the colour of each tulip is dependent on the one next to it. Encourage children to use their own words when describing what the order is, suggest they look for pairs that are easy to check.

 

 

 

 

Left

Right

Next

Rule

Pattern

Sequence

Order

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in understanding a sequence, and using it to solve a puzzle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­12 and 13: Which ladder?

 

 

Application:

 

A ‘dot to dot’ picture with a measuring puzzle to solve.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Following number in order up to 80, estimating height.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Adding on one from 1 to 80.

Using measure in a real life context.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Dot to dots are a very useful exercise in giving children practise in adding on with a number line.

 

On completing this picture there is a problem of measure to solve: four ladders are shown horizontally, and the reader is asked to say which one would be the correct height to reach the tree house safely. If a child is not sure, suggest they estimate first, then check by measuring the lengths with a piece of paper or ruler.

 

Discussing the lengths uses vocabulary involving measure, and making estimates.

 

Number 1 - 80

Height

Long

Short

Shortest

Longest

Shorter

Longer

Measure

estimate

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Knowing number up to 80. Confidence in estimating measure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­14 and 15: Daffodils

 

 

Application:

 

A story where Buzz cuts down daffodils by mistake, when mowing the grass.

 

Questions about counting the daffodils are on the next page.

 

Brief answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and go back to puzzles to look at them again if they missed something.

 

Full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils are presented with a problem about quantities in a story context.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solving problems with number, in a real life context.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The story shows Buzz cutting down 14 daffodils as well as the grass.

 

The story continues to ask the reader to work out how many daffodils were left in the garden, if there had been 36 before Buzz started.

Boxes are supplied to fill in. There are other ways they could work out the answer, and a discussion could be had on which way is easiest to calculate. Encourage children to do the sums in their heads.

 

 

 

How many

Sum

Addition

Take away

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Using mental arithmetic with a practical context.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 16: Curious garden

 

 

Application:

 

A picture puzzle that involves observation and reasoning. There are at least 22 different oddities to find.

 

The secret puzzle of spotting a caterpillar carries through each spread of the magazine, including this one.

 

(The answers on page 15 of the magazine gives 10 things and the full list can be found in online Answers)

 

 

Can be used as an introduction to keeping tallies.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting, keeping a tally, describing position.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Some of the curious things will be easy to spot, so all children should engage easily with this puzzle. Most will spot odd things growing in the vegetable patch.

 

Some may not be so easy to recognise. Encourage children to use language to describe why something is odd: what is wrong with the wheelbarrow other than goldfish swimming in it? Do bananas grow on trellises? An element of reasoning is required.

 

Suggest keeping a tally as each oddity is found, to keep a count of their discoveries. Cooperation in sharing knowledge comes from comparing with each other to see which ones may have been missed.

 

 

matches/ same/ different

direction

left, right

top, bottom

position

over/above

under/below

beside

next

upside down

tally

count

number

how many

square

 

Assessment strategy

By asking children to describe the location of the strange things they find their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words. Understanding how make a record of the number they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity sheet 11:  Magic Orchard (available online: see BUZZ Activity)

 

 

Application:

 

Buzz and Fizz introduce the magic square order 3

 

 

Using an orchard Buzz and Fizz ask the reader to investigate the properties of a magic square.

 

A pdf of the worksheet is available online

by clicking on the BUZZ button on the CIRCA Home page. Go to Activity Sheets, and click on the relevant picture:

http://www.circamaths.co.uk/buzzws11.htm

 

 

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investigating with number

 

Resources required: pencil

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Addition

Find mental calculation strategies

Use patterns for similar calculations

Problem solving

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The magic square, Order 3 (a magic square on a 3 x 3 grid with 9 cells), has been enjoyed across the world for centuries.  Known as Lo Shu in China, its properties were recorded over 4000 years ago. A short history and explanation of magic squares can be found in CIRCA issue 47, which also explores the 4-cell square, or Order 4.

 

Children will discover that each row, column and diagonal adds up to the same number, 15. There are 9 cells, and the numbers in the square only use the numbers one to nine. There is no other way these numbers could be arranged to do this (other arrangements are reflections or rotations). For an advanced extension, you could ask how you could change the magic summation (the total for each line) to make another number, such as 18 (by adding one to each cell).

Add

Total

How many

Row

Column

Diagonal

Cell

Summation

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

A confidence looking at number and mental addition­.

 

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