BUZZ    TeacherŐs Notes Volume 2/Number 6 (May 2009)

 

Cover: Count the crates

 

Application:

 

A puzzle requiring the counting of 3D shapes, where some are hidden.

 

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Pupils relate 3D shapes to pictures and recognise the different ways shapes can be made from cubes.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Knowing how 3D models and shapes are made, with increasing accuracy.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

 

The challenge here is to recognise that there are hidden cubes in each of the three shapes shown. Those who can say there are 5, 7 and 8-cube groups are demonstrating a sound understanding of the ways cubes can be arranged to make different shapes. To help those who find the task more difficult, they could be given cubes and asked to make the shapes shown in the dock scene.

 

All children will benefit by being able to make models with 3D shapes to match pictures is a useful exercise, offering the opportunity to describe the results.

 

To extend the activity, ask how many ways can the same number of cubes be arranged face to face? Can their features be described? Discuss layers, ask:  how many cubes can be seen from one side, how do you know there is a hidden cube?

 

 

Cube

3D

face

corner

edges

Matches/ Same/ Difference

Left, right

Top, bottom

Over/above

Under/below

Next to

Beside

Square

Cuboid

Single/double layered

Third layer

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in making models and shapes with increasing accuracy. Being able to describe their features. Vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­2 and 3: Introductory puzzle: Measure the Buzz kids, and contents 

 

 

Application:

 

The theme of Issue 6 is measure.

The introduction puzzle starts with considering the measurement of height. A cm ruler showing 111cm to 125 cm is shown at the side, so that each Buzz kidŐs height can be marked in position to help with this activity.

 

The Buzz kids give their heights in cm. There are boxes at the bottom to write in where the heights are to be sorted, shortest to tallest. A simple sentence about comparing LukeŐs height needs completing.

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Pupils look at length and sort measures, shortest to tallest.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve simple word problems involving measures and explain how the problem was solved.

Use mental calculation strategies to solve a measurement problem. Read a scale.

Retrieve data from information and organise and sort it.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

A discussion about how we record height could introduce this activity: many adults still measure height in feet and inches so it is useful to understand the vocabulary relating to measure and some of the commonly used imperial units, but they do not need to address equivalence at this level. Ask, how are childrenŐs clothing and sizes labelled? (metric and often by the height (from head to toe)).

 

Marking the heights on the scale at the side is a good way of organising the measures, and makes the sorting of shortest to tallest easier than just by scanning the numbers. It is also helpful in comparing heights (as in the sentence at the bottom). More questions could be asked, such as, how much taller is Sasha than Lucy?

Extension: make a simple block graph of the data.

 

 

Measure

Comparison

Difference

Height

Length

Shortest

Tallest

Centimetre

Metre

Feet and inches

metric

 

 

Assessment strategy

Understanding metric measures and relating to a scale. Confidence in collecting, sorting and organising information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 4 and 5:  Loads of Measuring

 

Application:

 

The reader is asked to answer problems about measure in a real life context.

 

Each correct answer will give them a letter that spells out a word in the Treasure Chest panel on the right.

 

Buzz and Fizz are also hidden in the picture.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Understand and use the vocabulary relating to length, mass and capacity.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve simple word problems involving measures and explain how the problem was solved.

Begin to understand the relationships between standard metric units.

Use mental calculation strategies to solve a measurement problem.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The Buzz kids present different types of measurements in their comments.  This gives the opportunity to use the vocabulary associated with each, and recognise the use of comparative words, such as heaviest. 

 

Encourage children to orally explain their method for solving word problems such as: how many loaves weighing one kilogram are in a 6 kg sack, and ask them to write a number sentence to show how they solved the problem (6 Ö 1 = 6), and how many 5 ml spoonfuls are in a bottle of 500ml ( 500 Ö 5 = 100). How far away is the island and the teapot question looks at the relationship between standard metric units, and it may help to point out the small scrolls along the bottom, which also show the abbreviations. Ask, how many metres in half a kilometre? How many millilitres in half a litre? Children in Year 3 and beyond should be more confident in dealing with the relationships between standard metric units, but younger children may well need help with these questions.

 

The variety of contexts here opens discussion on which sort of measure is suitable for measuring mass, length and capacity. There is an opportunity to look at uniform non-standard units of measure, such as spoonfuls and mugs, which are useful for making estimates and solving problems.

 

Ask, what else would you measure in metres, grams, litresÉ

 

 

Measure

Comparison

Difference

metric

Length

Metre

kilometre

weight/weighs

kilograms

heavy/heaviest

light, lightest

capacity

litres

millilitres

full, empty, holds

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to solve word problems and explain how to apply measure calculations in practical contexts. Children achieving in this understanding in Years 1 and 2 would be working at a high level, more expected of Year 3 and beyond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 6 and 7: WhatŐs the Catch?

 

 

Application:

 

Eight different lengths (fishing lines) have to be measured so that they can be matched with the objects in the Catch Box and the items drawn in the spaces at the end of each line.

 

A ruler is supplied down the side, so that a strip of paper could be marked to measure with some accuracy.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Using a ruler to measure with some accuracy

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Use simple measuring equipment with some accuracy.

Read and interpret a scale.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is accessible to Year 2 children and beyond, involving simple measuring with a ruler or a strip of paper marked with cm. The measures are to the nearest centimetre.

 

Encourage children to estimate which lines are the shortest and longest, before they check with the ruler.

 

Extension: With older children, the idea of scale could be introduced. If 1 cm on the picture represents 1 metre in real life, how big is the ship?

Measure

Comparison

Difference

Height

Length

Shortest

Longest

Centimetre

Metre

Metric

ruler

estimate

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in understanding metric measures and use simple equipment to measure with some accuracy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 8 and 9: Island maze

 

 

Application:

 

A maze that uses measure and simple compass directions to solve.

 

Three routes are given in a series of directions, and an opportunity to design a route for the fourth treasure.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Pupils solve a problem that involves the four compass directions and measure.

 

 

Resources required: pencil/ruler or strip of paper

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Position and direction: describing and following directions : recognising north, south east and west.

Give instructions to navigate a route.

Use simple measuring equipment to measure with some accuracy.

Problem solving, reasoning and numeracy: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

As with many BUZZ mazes, there are not obvious blocks or paths; the reader is required to follow rules in order to successfully complete the task.

Most children will have come across the basic four cardinal points; it may be helpful to explain how we use North to orientate a map and why this is useful. Point out the compass drawn on the map and ask which way is east, and so on, before starting the task.

 

A strip of paper marked carefully with cm (see page 7) or a cm ruler is required so that the distances can be measured. (An acetate sheet of a cm squared grid could be overlaid on the map for Year 1/2 children who could count the squares.)

 

Leaving the fourth treasure for the readers to devise a route gives opportunity to use the knowledge they have gained from following the directions. Ask, how

many different routes can you invent? WhatŐs the longest route you can devise? Which is the shortest?

 

For extensions, total distances to each treasure could be examined, and alternative routes found. On squared cm paper a map could be drawn and a route

described (making all paths at right angles to each other), then given to each other to try out.

Measure

Cm

North (N)

South (S)

East (E)

West (W)

Route

Way

Direction

Distance

position

 

navigate

instructions

right angle

left, right

up, down

along

Addition

 

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to describe position and direction. Confidence in using measure in cm and using compass points (Year 3). By asking children to explain directions their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­10 and 11: Measure match

 

 

Application:

 

A reasoning problem that extends the knowledge of the units used to measure length, mass or capacity, by looking at the activities of the eight Buzz Kids.

 

The reader is asked to match written statements to a list of measures. A hidden word will be revealed.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

A word problem presents a real life context that involves representing measure.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Suggest suitable units to estimate or measure length, mass or capacity in a variety of contexts.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

Develop mathematical ideas and methods to solve problems.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity uses the eight Buzz Kids to look at different situations requiring estimating measure and knowing which units to use.  Many children below Year 4 are not sure when to use grams or millilitres, so a discussion about capacity (the amount something will hold) and the heaviness of things will help. Talk about comparisons and how we estimate size.

 

In each circle, the Buzz kids give clues to the size they are talking about.

Ask, how tall is Jack? (see page 2) Use this to compare his height with the ladder. About how tall is the plant against the face of Yasmin? How does this compare with the width of the hut? How wide is a hand? Ask, which things would you use kilograms or grams to measure? Which is heavier, one pineapple or a sack of them? Many children will have filled a bowl with cups of water. If they had trouble with the teapot question on page 5 this may help. Remind them that l means litre and is equal to 1000 millilitres (see page 5).

 

Extension (Year 3 upwards): Ask what things can they think of that use the different units to measure, and make a list of things with estimates on how much they would weigh, or hold, or compare with their own height. The more they think about the units, the more confident they will become in using them.

Metres (m)

Centimetres (cm)

Grams (g)

Kilograms (kg)

Millilitres (ml)

Litres (l)

Capacity

Weight

Length

 

Heavy

Light

Full/ holds

Shorter than

Longer than

How long

How many

How much

Guess

Estimate

Roughly

Nearly/close

About

Approximately

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

The ability to solve word problems involving measure. Recognising which unit is appropriate. By asking children to explain their answers their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­12 and 13: WhatŐs so heavy?

 

 

Application:

 

A dot to dot picture, that when completed involves a simple problem about weight to solve.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Pupils practise number sequence up to 80 and solve a simple word problem.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Understand vocabulary relating to mass, and solve simple word problem involving measure.

Order a set of familiar numbers and position them on a number line.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The popular activity of joining dots 1 to 80 is accessible to Year 1 and up and is always good practice.

 

The simple word problem that follows demands understanding the units used to measure weight and making comparisons.

 

Extension:

Estimating which of two things is heavier, and deciding how to make things balance. What things are heavier or lighter than I kilogram? Estimate then check by weighing them.

 

 

Kilograms (kg) Grams (g)

Weight

balance

Heavy/heavier

Light/lighter

How much

Guess

Estimate

Roughly

Nearly/close

About

Approximately

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in number sequence and understanding kilograms measure weight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­14 and 15: Stuck inside

 

 

 

 

 

Application:

 

A story where Buzz has built a boat inside his house, only to discover it is too wide to get out though his front door.

 

Measurements of the boat are given and an invitation to draw or write a solution to the problem follows.

 

Brief answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and go back to puzzles to look at them again if they missed something.

 

Full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils are presented with a problem about size using a real life context.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Recognise width, length and depth in a practical context.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The story shows how Buzz has made a boat, but when he tries to push it outside, it is too wide to go through the door. Although this seems a simple problem, and accessible to most year groups, not all children we trialled found the solution that obvious.

 

A plan of the boat illustrates how a 3D object can be described as a diagram, in particular showing its size, and a conversation about this could be useful. The two sentences to complete are designed to help the solving problem process, but some imagination and making sense of a situation is required, so that a solution can be described using mathematics.

 

Drawing in their answer reinforces the concept.

 

 

 

 

Centimetre (cm)

Wider than

Narrower than

Width

Height

Length

Rotation/turn

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in making sense of problems relating to measure, with a practical context.

 

 

 

Page 16: Curious Island

 

 

Application:

 

A picture puzzle that involves observation and reasoning. There are at least 22 different oddities to find.

 

(The answers on page 15 of the magazine gives 10 things and the full list can be found in online Answers)

 

 

Can be used as an introduction to keeping tallies.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting, keeping a tally, describing position.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Some of the curious things will be easy to spot, so all children should engage easily with this puzzle. Some may not be so easy to recognise. Encourage children to use language to describe why something is odd: what is wrong with skiing down a volcano? Is there anything odd about one of the shadows? An element of reasoning is required!

 

Suggest keeping a tally as each oddity is found, to keep a count of their discoveries. Cooperation in sharing knowledge comes from comparing with each other to see which ones may have missed.

 

 

matches/ same/ different

direction

left, right

top, bottom

position

over/above

under/below

beside

next

upside down

tally

count

number

how many

 

Assessment strategy

By asking children to describe the location of the strange things they find their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words. Understanding how make a record of the number they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity sheets 6: Colouring Pencils (available online: see BUZZ Activity Sheets)

 

 

Application:

 

An investigation is presented by Buzz and Fizz as they consider lengths of some pencils.

 

The exercise requires estimating and checking (finding a solution to do this) lengths, then putting them in order of shortest to longest.

 

Finally the child is invited to colour in the pencils according to the descriptions that fit.

 

 

 

­­

Pupils estimate length and sort data.

 

Resources required: colouring pencils or felt tips. A ruler or strip of paper.

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Measure and compare: make direct (side by side) comparison.

Estimate, then check using standard units.

Problem solving: deciding on a method or tools to complete the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This worksheet is designed to be accessible to several Year groups. Most will make a successful guess at choosing the longest and shortest pencil.

 

The challenge will be to decide how to check the estimates and to be sure of guesses on the pencils in-between. If they have read BUZZ 6 they may well come up with the idea of making their own ruler, simply marking a strip of paper with each pencil height, making sure that the base mark remains the same each time. This will make putting the pencils in order of height very straight forward.

 

Extension: how accurate can you be? Do not use a ruler in the first place. Compare with the length of a finger: which is closest to the length of your index finger? Try to guess the height in cm, then check with a cm ruler.

 

 

Same/ Difference

Centimetre (cm)

taller than

longer than

shorter than

less than

Height

Length

Left, right

Position

Compare

Nearly

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

A confidence in being able to estimate length with some accuracy and finding a solution to a problem.