BUZZ    Teacher’s Notes Volume 3/Number 8 (March 2010)

 

Cover: Buzz

 

Application:

 

A puzzle to match the correct shadow to the parrot.

 

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Pupils recognise differences in shape and use a strategy to do the task.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

 

The challenge here is to look in detail at the shadow shapes, which vary in subtlety: for a missing foot to counting the feathers on a wing. Good observation is required, and most children will be able to do this without help, given a little time.

Ask, how would you describe the position?

 

Matches/ Same/ Difference

Left, right

Top, bottom

Over/above

Under/below

Next to

Beside

How many

Count

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in solving problems involving shape. Being able to describe features. Vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­2 and 3: Introductory puzzle: Which colour balls are there most of? and Contents 

 

 

Application:

 

The theme of Issue 8 is mathematical pictures: handling data.

 

The introduction puzzle shows the Buzz kids juggling, and asks how many of each colour ball is there.

 

A panel at the bottom allows the children to write in a tally while collecting the data.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Pupils collect information and annotate their results.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Count reliably a set of objects.

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data quickly making a tally chart. Extract and interpret from a table.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The reader is invited to count the balls the Buzz kids are juggling and sort them by colour. Children in Years 1, 2 and 3 may not have seen or used a tally chart before, but will soon recognise the usefulness of keeping count with the method of drawing lines, rather than numbers.

 

The box for green balls has been completed, and it could be explained that if there were five green balls, a fifth stroke would cross the four, making it easy to see five marks at a glance. Ask, why would this be useful? (With larger tallies, fives would be easy to add up.) Children may start by putting the marks for Becky’s balls, then Ahmad’s, and so on, or a count could be made of all the red balls, then all the next colour. Ask, which way is easier? This demonstrates the usefulness of keeping a tally to count sets, and using a table. 

 

The question at the end involves extracting and understanding the table they have completed, showing that the most common, or most popular, colour is blue. Ask, which colour is there least of?

 

 

Tally Chart

Sum

Addition

Number

Data

Sort

Set

List

Label

 

Most of

Most common

Least of

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in collecting data quickly and accurately, and then being able to answer questions about the results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 4 and 5:  Sort the animals

 

Application:

 

The reader is asked to sort the animal costumes and puppets by various criteria, noticing what they have in common to fit four different tables.

 

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

Organising data into tables.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This introduction to Caroll diagrams and other sorting exercises invites the reader to decide what qualities each animal has that might fit the categories in the table pairs. Quite young children will be able to find the things that two animals have in common, and their more obvious differences.

 

A discussion could be had on other criteria that could pair up animals, using the things they might know. It could be animals that have eggs, or animals that come out at night…Could they make some more table pairs with labels? (eg animals that fly: feathers/no feathers)

 

Sorting and organising data in this simple way leads on to more challenging data handling.

 

 

 

Data

Sort

Set

List

Label

Table

Title

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Being able to solve word problems in practical contexts, and use the information to complete tables shows good reasoning. Children achieving in this understanding in Years 1 and 2 would be working at a high level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 6 and 7: Learning lines

 

 

Application:

 

Following on from the previous page, the activity asks to check a numerical Caroll diagram, and find the mistakes made by Buzz the cat.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Recognising odd and even numbers, and those higher and lower than 20

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data quickly. Extract and interpret from a table.

Recognise odd and even numbers. Compare and order 2 digit numbers.

 

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is accessible to Year 2 children and beyond, but particularly suitable for Year 3, as they recognise which numbers are above and below a number on a number line, and the difference between odd and even numbers.

 

Remind children how to decide if a number is odd or even: does it divide exactly by two? Ask them to explain in their own words.

 

The Caroll Diagram has been completed, but the task is to see which names are in the wrong boxes. This involves checking each of the Buzz kid’s statements and deciding where their names should be in the diagram. The puzzle invites explanations and justifying decisions.

 

 

How many

Numbers

Tens

Units

Ones

Two-digit

Represents

Odd

Even

More than

Less than

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in ordering two digit numbers, sorting information using tables and diagrams.

Achieving an understanding of odd and even numbers and finding strategies to solve number problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages 8 and 9: Stage Set

 

 

Application:

 

The Buzz kids are preparing the stage for their show.

The task is to create a bar graph to show the frequency of each prop.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Sorting information to make a diagram.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Solve a given problem by collecting, sorting and organising information in simple ways.

Collecting data quickly and complete a table. Extract and interpret from a table, presenting data as a bar chart.

Identifying further questions.

Problem solving, reasoning and numeracy: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Children will enjoy looking for the items they have to count in the picture, including spotting where Fizz and Buzz are hiding.

 

Having completed the simple table, they are asked to complete the bar graph. Ask, why is a bar graph a useful way to show how many things there are? Talk about the visual aspect of diagrams like bar charts. What other way could they show the data? (Pictograms, bar line chart). Ask, when would a pictogram be a good way to show the data (e.g. when one pictogram can represent several units.) The final question illustrates how easy it is to see the answer when data is displayed visually.

Ask, what other questions and answers can be readily seen from the bar chart?

 

Data

How many

Number list

Represents

More than

Less than

Fewest

Most of

Bar chart

Table

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

To be able to sort, list and use diagrams confidently. By asking children to explain directions their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words.

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­10 and 11: Making Turns

 

 

Application:

 

A maze activity that challenges the reader to read a bar chart to match two routes.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

Solving a problem by extracting data from a bar chart

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Extract and interpret from a table.

Develop mathematical ideas and methods to solve problems.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Following on from making a bar chart in the previous pages, the reader is required to extract information from a bar chart to discover which routes Buzz and Fuzz take. For children new to reading bar charts, ask, How many turns is shown by the red bar, and how many turns by the green bar?  Understanding the task is part of the puzzle: once children know what they have to discover, finding the two routes is not difficult. To help, the first turn Fizz takes is shown.

 

Other routes the two cats could take could be discussed: which route takes the most number of turns? Could Buzz do it making 15 turns? How could Fizz do it in 16 turns (assuming a bit of retracing)? Could a bar chart be drawn to show all the number of turns in possible routes either cat could take?

 

 

 

Left

Right

Turn

Bar chart

Extract

Rule

Number

Fewest

Most

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in understanding bar charts and using them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­12 and 13: Colour by shape

 

 

Application:

 

A ‘colouring in’ picture with rules to follow.

 

Answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and

full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

Recognise shapes and follow rules.

 

 

Resources required: colouring pens or pencils (two greens, yellow, grey, brown and blue)

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Sort information from a list

Recognise 2D shapes and their differences

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Colouring in using a set of rules is good practise for using a table, and this colouring picture requires being familiar with different shapes, and recognising their properties.

 

Ask, what are these shapes called? (triangle, diamond, square, circle, rectangle, and pentagon). Care need to be taken in recognising the difference between the pentagon and the circle: it could be noticed that the more sides a regular shape has the closer it is to a circle. Ask, what is the difference between the rectangle and the diamond? (right angles). How many four sided shapes are used in the table?

 

 

shape

triangle

diamond

square

circle

rectangle

pentagon

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in recognising regular shapes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pages ­­14 and 15: Messy Mix

 

 

Application:

 

A story where Buzz forgets the time and has to make a cake.

 

Questions about matching a pie diagram to a recipe on the next page.

 

Brief answers are provided on page 15 of the magazine so that children can check for themselves, and go back to puzzles to look at them again if they missed something.

 

Full solutions can be found in the online Answers.

 

 

 

 

 

Pupils are presented with a problem about quantities in a story context.

 

 

Resources required: none

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Calculating time intervals.

Solving problems with fractions.

Interpret data in a pie chart (higher level).

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

The story shows Buzz forgetting the time and burning the cake. It gives the opportunity to ask, How long is half an hour? How many minutes have passed in one hour?

 

The story continues to show Buzz making a mess trying to make a new cake. The puzzle set on page 15 is quite advanced for the BUZZ reader, as it uses pie charts to show fractions (a type of diagram usually introduced to older readers). However, most children will understand the representation of half and a quarter in a circle, and with some prompting will be able to match the correct proportions to Pie chart 3. Explain that the circle is the whole amount, and each section showing the relationship of the three ingredients.

 

This is a simple example of using pie charts, and it may be useful to explain that the term ‘pie chart’ does not mean it is always about cooking or pies. They are diagrams that are useful when showing amounts or comparisons within a whole. Some able children will be able to say that the first pie chart shows thirds.

 

 

 

 

Half an hour

One hour

30 minutes

60 minutes

measure

half

quarter

Pie chart

Whole

Circle

Match

Thirds

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

Confidence in making sense of problems relating to measure, with a practical context.

 

 

 

Page 16: Curious Street

 

 

Application:

 

A picture puzzle that involves observation and reasoning. There are at least 22 different oddities to find.

 

The secret puzzle of spotting a parrot carries through each spread of the magazine, including this one.

 

(The answers on page 15 of the magazine gives 10 things and the full list can be found in online Answers)

 

 

Can be used as an introduction to keeping tallies.

 

 

Resources required: pencil

 

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Counting, keeping a tally, describing position.

Problem solving: making decisions and using appropriate language to resolve the task.

 

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

Some of the curious things will be easy to spot, so all children should engage easily with this puzzle. Most will spot square wheels, and jelly on the roof.

 

Some may not be so easy to recognise. Encourage children to use language to describe why something is odd: what is wrong with the traffic lights (other than one is a broom!)? (green should be at the bottom, and three lights do not come on together). There is an odd reflection in the puddle: the 4 should be back to front. The most subtle curious thing may be the numbers on the doors: ask, If houses are numbered even on one side, what should number should the yellow door have? An element of reasoning is required.

 

Suggest keeping a tally as each oddity is found, to keep a count of their discoveries. Cooperation in sharing knowledge comes from comparing with each other to see which ones may have been missed.

 

 

matches/ same/ different

direction

left, right

top, bottom

position

over/above

under/below

beside

next

upside down

tally

count

number

how many

 

Assessment strategy

By asking children to describe the location of the strange things they find their vocabulary will be extended using appropriate words. Understanding how make a record of the number they find.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity for the Whiteboard/PC:  Space Tally (available online: see BUZZ Activity)

 

 

Application:

 

Space Tally is an animated activity that will work on any computer that has Microsoft’s Powerpoint Player. It is a short musical show that requires making a tally. Two versions are available (pre and post Powerpoint 2007 versions). Go to:

http://www.circamaths.co.uk/white1.html

 

If you don't have Powerpoint you can download a free Powerpoint player at www.microsoft.com/downloads

 

A PDF of the recording sheet, designed to be used with the activity, is available online by clicking on the BUZZ button on the CIRCA Home page, go to Activity Sheets, and click on the relevant picture:

http://www.circamaths.co.uk/buzzws8.html

­­­­

 

­­

making a tally

 

Resources required: pencil

 

Learning objective taken from the Mathematics Framework:

Collecting and sorting information

Presenting data in a frequency table using an appropriate method

 

Activities

 

Vocabulary/keywords

This activity is designed to be accessible to several Year groups, and can be used at home on a computer as well as in the classroom with the whiteboard. The recording sheet will be very useful for making the tally.

To answer the last question a copy of BUZZ (any issue) should be opened on page 2. Click on the file ending in .pps or .ppsx to open the activity (if it fails to open, Powerpoint may already be open and the file can be opened from there, (go to File menu, Open). It will also work to close Powerpoint and click on the .pps file again to open directly into the show).

 

There are a few times when the activity waits for a click (or using the arrow keys) but most of the action takes place automatically (be careful not to double click or click when not prompted, as this will skip the stages).

Some computer systems may not play the music files with the .pps file, but the music (three files ending in .mp3), while adding to the enjoyment of the activity, is not essential. There are embedded sounds that should work on all systems.

 

It is recommended to watch the show beforehand if preparing for a classroom activity. (It lasts about ten minutes.) The recording sheets can be printed off beforehand ready to fill in. The five things to count appear with Buzz and Fizz (the correct term for meteoroids is used for the scientific experts amongst the children, rather than the word meteor, which is a streak of light). At the prompt, Ready!, the things begin to float past the window. The pace will be quite fast, and younger children may like to work in pairs so that one can call out the things whilst the other keeps the tally. Some may know to cross through the four strokes to make five, but it is not essential at this stage.

 

On a click prompt, the tally will be shown so that children can check their results. If necessary, a Go back button will appear so that they can watch the show again and correct any that were missed. It could be discussed why keeping a tally is useful in a task like this (writing out numbers would be time consuming and lead to mistakes), and when a tally might be useful in other cases (collecting data about traffic, for example).

 

The last question needs a simple elimination exercise to see which two Buzz Kids are missing.

 

Extension: A bar chart could be made to show the data they have collected.

Questions such as, which thing is there least of, or most of, could be asked.

 

Of interest: Tallies date back to pre-history and were in everyday use in Europe into the 19th Century. Roman numerals possibly developed from keeping tallies, with single strokes up to 4, five represented by V , and ten by X. The new Palace of Westminster was built after a great fire of the tally sticks which were stored in the original building.

 

 

Tally

Add

Total

Chart

How many

Least of

Most of fewest

Most

 

 

 

 

Assessment strategy

A confidence in recording data for use in presenting frequency and bar charts.