© Juliet & Charles Snape 2008
(Please note some solutions are dependent on images and are omitted here. If you need a
particular solution please e-mail).

Volume 13 (Solutions for: CIRCA 37, CIRCA 38 and CIRCA 39)

CIRCA 37: Solutions

Front cover/Fleet puzzle:
The minimum number of ships that Sir Walter could have had in his fleet is three, one of each type.

Pages 2 and 3/L.s.d.
1. A pair of shoes £36.
2. A posh pair of boots £5760.
3. A week’s wages for a carpenter £64.
4. A loaf of bread £1.50.
5. Cost of building the Mary Rose £264 000.
6. Sir Walter Raleigh’s income in a good year £816 000.

Guaging how the buying power of money changes over centuries is difficult. The Tudor period,
in particular, is very complicated due to the rampant inflation mainly caused by the influx into
Europe of gold and silver from the Americas.


Shilling search
Ther are a total of 21 lines of shillings (12d).

Horizontal (from top left):
line 1: 5, 2, 4, 1 and 1, 11
line 2: 2, 4, 6
line 3: 3, 9
line 4: 3, 1, 7, 1
line 5: 10, 2

Vertical (from top left):
line 1: 5, 6, 1 and 1, 3, 8
line 2: 2, 4, 6
line 3: 2, 3, 7 and 3, 7, 2
line 4: 1, 1, 9, 1
line 5: 1, 1, 10

Diagonal (left to right, starting from top right):
line 4: 2, 9, 1
line 5: 5, 4, 3
line 6: 6, 6 and 7, 5

Diagonal (right to left, starting from bottom right):
line 4: 9, 3
line 5: 8, 1, 3 and 1, 11
line 6: 3, 6, 2, 1

Pages 4 and 5/
An approximate day
1. M 2. O 3. R 4. E 5. O
The character spelt out is ROMEO, from the tragedy Romeo and Juliet.

Page 6 and 7/Mathematical pies
IAddition pies
100 + 20 = 120, 112 + 88 = 200, 58 + 80 = 138, 120 + 90 = 210

Subtraction pies
17 – 12 = 5, 36 – 27 = 9, 32 – 17 = 15, 15 – 8 = 7

Multiplication pies
7 x 15 = 105, 15 x 12 = 180, 20 x 15 = 300, 15 x 9 = 135

Division pies
1010 ÷ 10 = 101, 225 ÷ 25 = 9, 360 ÷ 20 = 18,
10 000 ÷ 5 = 2000

Jumbled pies
3 x 4 = 12, 24 ÷ 2 = 12, 20 – 8 = 12, 9 + 3 = 12

Page 8 and 9/Groaning groats


























Pages 10 and 11/Who won the race ?
The course (start to finish) is 28.5 metres in a straight line. They all finished at the same time.
Francis’ path was 42.5 metres. He ended up 9 metres from the finish line. He ran the fastest.
Dick’s path was 41.5 metres. He ended up 2 metres from the finish line. He was nearest to
the finish line. Tom’s path was 31.5 metres. He ended up 4 metres from the finish line. His was
the most direct route.

According to accepted rules, if no one crosses the finish line there is no winner. So the judge’s
decision seems correct.However, this is a ‘fun run’ of sorts, so pupils might like to discuss each
runner’s claim to be the winner and may come to a different conclusion.

For information
‘Tom, Dicke and Francis’ are the forerunner of ‘Tom. Dick and Harry’ the common expression
used to describe an average person or persons. The former appears in Shakespeare’s Henry IV
part II, the latter appears in song lyrics in the 1740’s.


Pages 12 and 13/A right royal mix-up

1.
Find the queen
The queen is C.

2. Who's who?
A: Jack of Clubs, B: Queen of Hearts, C: King of Spades and D: Queen of Diamonds

3. Where are the jacks?
Armoury: Diamonds
Games Room: Clubs
Library: Hearts
Dungeon: Spades

4. Wh sits where?
From left to right: King of Spades, Jack of Clubs, Jack of Hearts, Queen of Hearts, King of Clubs,
Queen of Diamonds, Queen of Spades.

Pages 14 and 15 /Are you puzzled?
Tudor times
The hands are showing 3 x 9 = 27.

Identical helmets
The identical helmets are 8 and 14.

Contrary number
43 is the odd one out. It is a prime number and has no factors.
All the other numbers are divisible by 3.
(It would be possible to find a reason why each number is contrary, e.g.
21 is the only multiple of 7,
48 is the only number whose digits are both even,
15 is the only multiple of 5,
12 is the only number less than 13.

Edward and the purses
Two servants received 2 purses with a sovereign in, 1 purse with half sovereign in and 2 empty purses.
The third servant got the remaining 5 purses (1 + sovereign, 3 + 3 half sovereigns and 1 empty purse).

Henry and eight
8 - 5 = 3, 8 - 2 = 6, 6 + 1 =7, 3 + 4 = 7

Henry's sevens
The numbers that sum to100 are 56 (divisible by 7), 17 and 27.

Elizabeth and potatoes
TThe large bag weighs 30 kilograms.

This problem can be solved with trial and improvement or
by algebra.

2x + y = 80 (first gift)
3x + 2y = 130 (second gift)

If the first gift is doubled:

4x + 2y = 160

Compare the second gift and the doubled first gift:
4 large bags and two small bags = 160
3 large bags and two small bags = 130
The difference in sacks is x, the difference in totals is 30,
so x = 30. Therefore, weight of one large bag = 30 kilograms.


Page 16 (back cover)/Tudor Inn
Alice booked the family into Chimney’s Hotel. It was the cheapest at £127.50 for the whole family.
Here’s how they all worked out:

The King Henry Hotel 3 adults @ £32.50 is £97.50,
2 children @ £20.00 is £40.00. Total £137.50.

Good Queen Bess Inn 2 double rooms @ £65.00 is £130.00. Camp bed @ £10.00. Total £140.00

Chimney’s Hotel 3 adults @ £35.00 is £105.00, 1 child under 12 years @ £22.50 and 1 child under 6 free. Total £127.50

Tudor Towers Apartments 1 apartment sleeping 6 is £147.50


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CIRCA 38: Solutions

Front cover/Crossing the bridges:
The journey can only be successfully traversed if started or finished at Willow Island or Rose Island.
Two ways are shown here.














.

Pages 2 and 3/Square thoughts
1. Kuang’s quiz
1. 82 sq chi 2. 56 sq chi 3. 2 sq chi 4. 12 sq chi
5. 16 chi 6. 34 sq chi

The correct solutions spell out WISDOM, which is, along with strength and goodness, one of the
special qualities associated with Chinese dragons.


Pages 4 and 5/Great Wall of China

1. M 1. K, 2. O, 3. Y, 4. N, 5. E, 6. M

1.The letters re-arranged spell MONKEY.

Below, circled, are the 12 hidden animals:




























1. Dragon, 2. Sheep, 3. Pig, 4. Horse, 5. Ox, 6. Snake, 7. Rooster, 8. Dog, 9. Monkey,
10. Hare, 11. Tiger, 12. Rat


Page 6 and 7/Box it up
O = big vase, G = screen,
A = parasol (folded), D = cute pig,
R = mask, N = bookends

The ‘box checker’ tells you that Aunty Feifei’s gift company is dragon.com


Page 8 and 9/Measure the way
Below left: the short route. Below right: the long route.














Pages 10 and 11/Cut the cake
















There are other ways to cut and transform the shapes.

Pieces 4 and 5 are smaller.
The others are all the same size.

Treasure chest
Diamond: shape 4, Pearl: shape 1, Ruby: shape 2,
Opal: shape 5, Sapphire: shape 6, Topaz: shape 3

For information
This kind of dissection problem is very old. It was very popular in Ancient China many thousands of years
ago. Dissection problems led to the invention of the popular Tangram Square and its associated puzzles.


Pages 12 and 13/Tearing tangrams

Area Squares with tans
The area of the
tans are:
A is 2 units,
B is 2 units,
C is 1 unit,
D is 0.5 unit,
E is 1 unit,
F is 0.5 unit,
G is 1 unit
























Pages 14 and 15 /Are you puzzled?
7-piece tangram puzzles














Which house?
(3) is correct.

Tangram birds













Find the shape



















Cutting shapes
(1) = (G), (2) = (A), (3) = (B).

Chinese year names
(1) The Sydney Olympics took place in 2000. This was a year of the Dragon. (2) The London Olympics take place in 2012, this is also a year of the Dragon.

Going potty
1. crack longer
2. missing pattern
3. flower missing
4. seaweed shorter
5. fin missing
6. crack longer
7. whisker missing
8. petal missing
9. band coloured
10. puddle large








Page 16 (back cover)/Magic square
Alice’s completed magic square of order 4:









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CIRCA 39: Solutions

June 2008.